Monday, January 30, 2012

THE NAVY, THE NETHERLANDS: Don't Be Too Quick To Judge!

WISDOM   WISDOM   WISDOM   WISDOM   WISDOM   WISDOM   WISDOM   WISDOM   WISDOM   WISDOM

YOUR PERSONAL GPS
You might find your life's destination better
if you reserved judgement until you had personal experience in the subject mattter

THINGS ARE NOT ALWAYS AS THEY FIRST SEEM!

USS HECTOR AR7
Flag Ship COMSERVPAC 1949
Around 1949, in the Navy, I was transfered from a temporary assignment aboard the USS Hector, AR7 in Long Beach, California to the USS Yuma ATF94 in Vallejo, California.  The Hector was a very large repair ship and the flag ship of CONSERPAC.  It was salute, spit and polish, inspections and, excepting for liberty 3 nights out of 4 in Long Beach, it was the most miserable of duties, BOOT CAMP ALL OVER AGAIN!.

When I reported for duty aboard the sea going tug, she had just finished tours of duty in China and Alaska and was completing a long, badly needed overhaul.  She was a bit over 200 feet long and only 35 feet in width, she could have fit on the Hector's stern.  Half the crew was on leave.  The galley was outside on the dock and electrical lines and assorted hoses totally fouled the ship.  As I went aboard, saluting the flag and the quarterdeck, Shields, the seaman on watch, in t-shirt and dungarees, broke right out laughing.


 I thought,
DEAR LORD, WHAT HAVE I GOT MYSELF INTO?

Eighteen years of age at the time, I grew up on the Yuma.  She took me up and down the U.S. west coast, to and from Hawaii many times, to Guam and the Marianas Islands, Japan, the Philippines, down to the northern tip of New Guinea and to every major island group in the Pacific.  Eventually, I became a petty officer and the ship's senior radioman.  Cmdr. Howard G. Labo was the best skipper in the world and quartermaster Lewis Tucker the best of friends.  And, perhaps most important, the old Yuma was a feeder!

 MY THREE YEARS ABOARD THE USS YUMA ARE AMONG MY FONDEST MEMORIES.

 Look at this picture of the fleet tug, the USS UTE ATF76, tied up to what looks like an ugly part of the world.

NOT SO!

I have had the "ready duty" at this very dock  many times. Two miles away is the beach at Waikiki in Honolulu, truly a paradise full of beautiful wahines. looking for their sailor boy.  Un Huh!  UGLY PART OF THE WORLD?  NOT REALLY!

CLEARLY, THINGS WERE NOT AS THEY FIRST SEEMED!

Think about a country where 25% of it's area is below sea level as is 21% of it's population.  In fact, 50% of it's land is only one metre above sea level.

Wouldn't you at first imagine the people who live in such a land would tend to be depressed?

IT AIN'T SO!

In May 2011 the Netherlands were judged to be the happiest country in the world.  Yes, it might be because they love and respect Queen Beatrix.

The happiness of the Dutch may be due to the extreme liberalness of the country.  They are not hampered with all the laws and regulations as we are in America.  Drugs?  Yep, they are legal!  No drug wars in Holland.  Prostitution?  It's on public display.  Actually, they are more into bicycles and ice skates. The economy?  The Dutch have always done quite well, thank you.  The Peace Palace of the world, THE HAGUE, is located in the Netherlands.


Don't let all this sweet talk about the Netherlands lead you to think the Dutch are any push overs.  Financially, we owe them our shirts for money we have borrowed from them.  Their miltary is small but sound.  Although they had the wisdom not to destroy themselves against the Nazi juggernaut, today they join in with other nations to maintain peace in the world.  An ancient sea going people, this is a picture of one of their modern naval vessels.



DON'T JUDGE THE IMPORTANCE OF THE DUTCH BY THEIR SIZE
My wife and I have been to Amsterdam and would love to return.
I also have blog readers in the Netherlands.

SO OFTEN WE SUCUMB TO QUICK JUDGEMENTS
Take care, first judgements are often wrong!

God Bless You and Yours

GOD BLESS THE USA

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