Tuesday, January 24, 2012

WOMEN ALWAYS WORE APRONS: Further Childhood Memories!

THE GOOD LIFE   THE GOOD LIFE   THE GOOD LIFE   THE GOOD LIFE   THE GOOD LIFE   THE GOOD LIFE

LADY OF THE '30's DECIDING WHATS FOR DINNER
My mother always wore a similiar apron
After writing the book review on Shantyboat Bill last night, my thoughts throughout the night and morning are of my childhood sights and sounds.  I wrote of Dad drinking coffee from a saucer.  After the first sip he would sigh a big Aaaah!  I thought of making lye soap in a big back iron kettle, how the soap was cut into small squares.  I thought about how it smelled and how it would irritate your skin when you used it.

I thought of the sound my Grandma Pierce made as she puffed on her little clay pipe, common among the Irish ladies.  GRANDMA PIERCE WAS A LADY!  Grandpa raised her tobaco for her.  In her latter days, if someone gave her a "ready-made" cigarette, she'd remove the paper from the tobacco and smoke the tobacco in her little, white pipe.  The pipe had a straight, unfiltered stem.  Grandma lived to be 89  She'd say "if you'll bring me a match, Honey, I'll dance your wedding in a hog trough".  She was the best shodisher in Frazer's Bottoms in the 1870's..


Then, this morning I came across this poem on aprons.  When I think of Mom or Grandma Pierce, who made her home with us, they are always wearing an apron.  Always!  If preacher Jackson came a'call'n, you should have seen my grandma changing her work apron for a starched white one.  They had to make their starch in those days and iron with a sad iron heated on top of the old, black iron cookstove.  Mom said that if "A fly lighted on Grandma's slick ironed apron, he'd bust his behind".  ENJOY!

GRANDMA'S APRON

The principle use of Grandma's apron was
to protect the dress underneath, but along with that,
it served as a holder for removing hot pans from the oven;
it was wonderful for drying children's tears,
and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears.

From the chicken-coop the apron was used for carrying eggs,
fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched
eggs to be finished in the warming oven.

When company came those old aprons were an ideal hiding place
for shy kids, and when the weather was cold,
grandma wrapped it around her arms.

Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow,
bent over the hot stoves.  Chips and kindling-wood
were brought into the kitchen in that apron.

After the peas had been shelled it carred out the hulls.
In the fall it was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.

When unexpected company drove up the road,
 it was surprising how much furniture that old apron
could dust in a matter of seconds.

When dinner was ready,
Grandma walked out on the porch and waved her apron,
and the men knew it was time to come in from the fields for dinner.

It will be a long time before anyone invents something
that will replace that old-time apron that served so many purposes.

Author Unknown

I have several aprons and wear one of them when I'm baking pies.  Keeps the flour off of me and is used for many of the above mentioned purposes.  Otherwise, I don't think any of my women folk are much for wearing aprons today, none that comes to mind.

THOUGHTS OF DAYS GONE BY
What memories come to your mind about your youth?

God Bless You and Yours

GOD BLESS THE  USA

No comments: